Ut how the virus spreads partners can do journal.pone.0158910 to help ?Speak

Ut how the virus spreads partners can do to help ?Speak out against negative social media statements about groups of people, or exclusion of people, who counter stigmatization pose no risk of transmitting Ebola virus from regular activities during the Ebola response ?Engage with stigmatized groups in person and through media channels, including news media and social media ?Share the need for social support for people who have returned from the affected region or are worried about friends or relatives in affected regionsattend community events, and visit neighborhoods to better appreciate specific cultures and values. It is also useful for staff to take a step back and assess how their own beliefs and experiences affect how they see and react to unfamiliar settings.10 When working with CFBOs, health department staff members Bayer 41-4109 web should be transparent about their expectations, particularly when resources and funding are involved, because misunderstandings can easily occur. In some cases, clearly outlining expectations in an e-mail may be enough. In other cases, partners may want to use a memorandum of understanding to outline roles and responsibilities.11 Resources are available to assist local and state health departments in building Dalfopristin web relationships with CFBOs (Figure 2). Step 6: anticipate and identify specific information needs Communication teams should identify information needs of the community. At the national level, CDC held two calls for CFBOs about Ebola in October 2014 with more than 2,000 individuals representing several hundred organizations across the United States. Communication needs identified during the calls included basic information about Ebola symptoms and transmission, public health policies on travel and contacttracing, strategies for reducing stigma and anxiety, SART.S23506 and communication products in plain language. Anticipating communication and language needs can allow community mobilization teams to engage CFBOs from the start of an Ebola response and optimally collaborate with CFBOs as trusted sources of information to deliver messages within their communities. The most current Ebola information and communication resources are available at http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/index.html.1 Step 7: work together to develop messages as part of a community mobilization strategy for Ebola response Effective engagement requires two-way learning. Communication teams should understand both Ebola and their audiences. When developing health messages, they may need to learn more about perceptions of preparedness, disease, and disaster, and the language needs of specific communities.2 Understanding health beliefs and language needs can help the team develop messages that are consistent with the community’s experiences and expectations. For staff members unfamiliar with a particular culture or faith, it is better to be honest about unfamiliarity, express interest in learning, and ask respectful questions rather than make generalizations and risk creating ineffective messages. Health departments may choose to take the lead inPublic Health Reports / March pril 2015 / VolumeHealth Communications and Community Mobilization During Ebola Responsedeveloping drafts of messages and then share them with community partners for feedback, or they may develop communication materials initially based on needs identified by CFBOs. In other instances, CFBOs may develop their own messages and share them with public health staff members to review for scientific accu.Ut how the virus spreads partners can do to help ?Speak out against negative social media statements about groups of people, or exclusion of people, who counter stigmatization pose no risk of transmitting Ebola virus from regular activities during the Ebola response ?Engage with stigmatized groups in person and through media channels, including news media and social media ?Share the need for social support for people who have returned from the affected region or are worried about friends or relatives in affected regionsattend community events, and visit neighborhoods to better appreciate specific cultures and values. It is also useful for staff to take a step back and assess how their own beliefs and experiences affect how they see and react to unfamiliar settings.10 When working with CFBOs, health department staff members should be transparent about their expectations, particularly when resources and funding are involved, because misunderstandings can easily occur. In some cases, clearly outlining expectations in an e-mail may be enough. In other cases, partners may want to use a memorandum of understanding to outline roles and responsibilities.11 Resources are available to assist local and state health departments in building relationships with CFBOs (Figure 2). Step 6: anticipate and identify specific information needs Communication teams should identify information needs of the community. At the national level, CDC held two calls for CFBOs about Ebola in October 2014 with more than 2,000 individuals representing several hundred organizations across the United States. Communication needs identified during the calls included basic information about Ebola symptoms and transmission, public health policies on travel and contacttracing, strategies for reducing stigma and anxiety, SART.S23506 and communication products in plain language. Anticipating communication and language needs can allow community mobilization teams to engage CFBOs from the start of an Ebola response and optimally collaborate with CFBOs as trusted sources of information to deliver messages within their communities. The most current Ebola information and communication resources are available at http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/index.html.1 Step 7: work together to develop messages as part of a community mobilization strategy for Ebola response Effective engagement requires two-way learning. Communication teams should understand both Ebola and their audiences. When developing health messages, they may need to learn more about perceptions of preparedness, disease, and disaster, and the language needs of specific communities.2 Understanding health beliefs and language needs can help the team develop messages that are consistent with the community’s experiences and expectations. For staff members unfamiliar with a particular culture or faith, it is better to be honest about unfamiliarity, express interest in learning, and ask respectful questions rather than make generalizations and risk creating ineffective messages. Health departments may choose to take the lead inPublic Health Reports / March pril 2015 / VolumeHealth Communications and Community Mobilization During Ebola Responsedeveloping drafts of messages and then share them with community partners for feedback, or they may develop communication materials initially based on needs identified by CFBOs. In other instances, CFBOs may develop their own messages and share them with public health staff members to review for scientific accu.

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