Nsfer’ (CPET), that makes the mechanistic implication explicit.9 We support using

Nsfer’ (CPET), that makes the mechanistic implication explicit.9 We support using this term to refer to any chemical reaction where one H+ and one e- are transferred in a single kinetic step. CPET is equivalent to the `CEP’ term (concerted electron/proton) used by Hammarstr and coworkers,10 and the `EPT’ moniker (electron/proton transfer) used by Meyer et al.1a CPET (/CEP/EPT) processes contrast with stepwise processes involving either initial ET followed by PT, or PT followed by ET, as shown in Scheme 1. In this and the other Schemes in this review, proton transfer processes are horizontal lines, ET processes are vertical lines, and processes that involve protons and electrons are diagonal lines. Readers should be aware that other workers have chosen other representations that better illustrate their particular concerns (cf., ref. 5). The stepwise pathways in Scheme 1 for 1H+/1e- transfer reactions are proton transfer followed by electron transfer (PT-ET) and ET-PT. Many examples of PT-ET, ET-PT, and concerted reactions are known. For instance, the groups of Ingold and Foti have shown that acidic phenols can react by a PT-ET type mechanism termed `sequential proton-loss electron transfer’ or SPLET (adding to the list of acronyms).11?213 Hammarstr et al. have shown that the aqueous ruthenium-tyrosine complexes can undergo ET-PT, CPET, or PT-ET processes depending on the pH.10,14 ET-PT pathways are particularly well documented in the electrochemical literature, where they are a type of EC mechanism (electrochemical then chemical).15 The factors that determine which path is followed are discussed in Section 6, below. 2.2 Hydrogen Atom Transfer (HAT) Hydrogen atom transfer has been studied by physical and organic chemists for over a century.16 It is key to the rate and selectivity of a variety of free radical reactions, including radical Luteolin 7-O-��-D-glucoside chemical information chains as in autoxidation and combustion. The abstraction of H?from organic compounds by peroxyl radicals has been especially widely discussed and researched because they are important to disease states, aging and food preservation.17 In the older physical-organic literature there was no need to define HAT, as it was selfevident that this referred to reactions involving concerted transfer of H?from a donor (XH) to an acceptor (Y, Scheme 2).18 We will use this definition here, NIK333 web noting that `concerted’ implies a single kinetic step for transfer of the two particles but does not necessarily imply synchronous transfer. By this definition, HAT is one class of CPET reactions.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptIn the last 25 years it has been recognized that transition metal coordination complexes and metalloenzymes can undergo HAT reactions, and that there is overlap between traditional HAT reactions and PCET. This has led to the appearance of a number of new definitions and new thinking about HAT.192021?2 For instance, computationally there is a clear orbital distinction between degenerate H?exchange between toluene and benzyl radical, versus exchange between phenol and phenoxyl radical.19 In toluene, the H+ and e- start in the same bond and end in the same bond. In the phenol/phenoxyl reaction, however, the proton is in the molecular plane but the transferring electron is in an orthogonal symmetry orbital. 19 To deal with such distinctions, Meyer et al. have proposed to restrict HAT to reactions where “the transferring electron and proton come from the same bond.”1,20 T.Nsfer’ (CPET), that makes the mechanistic implication explicit.9 We support using this term to refer to any chemical reaction where one H+ and one e- are transferred in a single kinetic step. CPET is equivalent to the `CEP’ term (concerted electron/proton) used by Hammarstr and coworkers,10 and the `EPT’ moniker (electron/proton transfer) used by Meyer et al.1a CPET (/CEP/EPT) processes contrast with stepwise processes involving either initial ET followed by PT, or PT followed by ET, as shown in Scheme 1. In this and the other Schemes in this review, proton transfer processes are horizontal lines, ET processes are vertical lines, and processes that involve protons and electrons are diagonal lines. Readers should be aware that other workers have chosen other representations that better illustrate their particular concerns (cf., ref. 5). The stepwise pathways in Scheme 1 for 1H+/1e- transfer reactions are proton transfer followed by electron transfer (PT-ET) and ET-PT. Many examples of PT-ET, ET-PT, and concerted reactions are known. For instance, the groups of Ingold and Foti have shown that acidic phenols can react by a PT-ET type mechanism termed `sequential proton-loss electron transfer’ or SPLET (adding to the list of acronyms).11?213 Hammarstr et al. have shown that the aqueous ruthenium-tyrosine complexes can undergo ET-PT, CPET, or PT-ET processes depending on the pH.10,14 ET-PT pathways are particularly well documented in the electrochemical literature, where they are a type of EC mechanism (electrochemical then chemical).15 The factors that determine which path is followed are discussed in Section 6, below. 2.2 Hydrogen Atom Transfer (HAT) Hydrogen atom transfer has been studied by physical and organic chemists for over a century.16 It is key to the rate and selectivity of a variety of free radical reactions, including radical chains as in autoxidation and combustion. The abstraction of H?from organic compounds by peroxyl radicals has been especially widely discussed and researched because they are important to disease states, aging and food preservation.17 In the older physical-organic literature there was no need to define HAT, as it was selfevident that this referred to reactions involving concerted transfer of H?from a donor (XH) to an acceptor (Y, Scheme 2).18 We will use this definition here, noting that `concerted’ implies a single kinetic step for transfer of the two particles but does not necessarily imply synchronous transfer. By this definition, HAT is one class of CPET reactions.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptIn the last 25 years it has been recognized that transition metal coordination complexes and metalloenzymes can undergo HAT reactions, and that there is overlap between traditional HAT reactions and PCET. This has led to the appearance of a number of new definitions and new thinking about HAT.192021?2 For instance, computationally there is a clear orbital distinction between degenerate H?exchange between toluene and benzyl radical, versus exchange between phenol and phenoxyl radical.19 In toluene, the H+ and e- start in the same bond and end in the same bond. In the phenol/phenoxyl reaction, however, the proton is in the molecular plane but the transferring electron is in an orthogonal symmetry orbital. 19 To deal with such distinctions, Meyer et al. have proposed to restrict HAT to reactions where “the transferring electron and proton come from the same bond.”1,20 T.

Leave a Reply