Alized in clinical practice. Religious orientations and related care preferences are

Alized in clinical practice. Religious orientations and related care preferences are not routinely addressed in diabetes care encounters. At the same time, strong evidence indicates African American medical distrust ?grounded in a history of racism, discrimination, research mistreatment, and unequal medical treatment ?remains while diabetes health disparities persist. Diabetes care for African Americans requires attention to rebuilding trust with consideration of individual religious orientations, care needs, and treatment preferences through, for example, shared decision-making (SDM). SDM is a bidirectional relationship between patient and provider involving shared deliberation, negotiation, and agreement about the most suitable treatment plan (Peek, Odoms-Young, Quinn, et al, 2010). For those African Americans with a strong religious orientation, SDM may reveal a need to attend to patient religious health beliefs and practices. For many African Americans, SDM may uncover patient needs for acquisition of diabetes-related knowledge and skills to foster success with prevention and self-management behaviors. SDM may further reveal patient preferences for delivery of routine diabetes care and education in churches, and other culturally concordant settings, where African Americans may benefit from religious social support and other health-related resources. The American Diabetes Association and American Association of Diabetes Educators recommend a model of shared decision making in the provision of diabetes care and education. While it may take over a decade for uptake of evidence-based recommendations in clinical practice, the Affordable Care Act’s value-based payment strategy may accelerate uptake with modification in practice patterns to facilitate achievement of performance standards. Fruquintinib msds Accelerated uptake of SDM in clinical practice ?with attention to religious orientations and preferences in addition to diabetes prevention and self-management behaviors as warranted ?may help to rebuild trust in the African American community and facilitate more optimal care for this population disproportionately burdened by diabetes.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptAcknowledgmentsFunding: NINR F32 NR010043, NIH NYU CTSA KL2 1ULRRJ Relig Health. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 June 01.Newlin Lew et al.PageBiographyDr. Kelley Newlin Lew is an assistant professor at the University of Connecticut, School of Nursing. Her research focuses on the intersection of diabetes, self-management, and religion and spirituality. She is a past recipient of NIH F31, F32, and KL2 funding. She was awarded the Eastern Nursing Research Society’s Rising Star award in 2010.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript
Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common pregnancy complication, is defined as glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy [1]. Approximately 7 (ranging from 1 to 14 ) of all pregnancies in the United States are complicated by GDM, resulting in more than 200,000 cases annually [1]. Women with GDM have an increased risk for Abamectin B1a site prenatal morbidity and a considerably elevated risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after pregnancy [1]. Furthermore, the offspring of women with GDM are more likely to be obese and have impaired glucose tolerance and T2DM in their early adulthood [2]. Adiposity is an important modifiable risk factor for the development of GDM [3], althoug.Alized in clinical practice. Religious orientations and related care preferences are not routinely addressed in diabetes care encounters. At the same time, strong evidence indicates African American medical distrust ?grounded in a history of racism, discrimination, research mistreatment, and unequal medical treatment ?remains while diabetes health disparities persist. Diabetes care for African Americans requires attention to rebuilding trust with consideration of individual religious orientations, care needs, and treatment preferences through, for example, shared decision-making (SDM). SDM is a bidirectional relationship between patient and provider involving shared deliberation, negotiation, and agreement about the most suitable treatment plan (Peek, Odoms-Young, Quinn, et al, 2010). For those African Americans with a strong religious orientation, SDM may reveal a need to attend to patient religious health beliefs and practices. For many African Americans, SDM may uncover patient needs for acquisition of diabetes-related knowledge and skills to foster success with prevention and self-management behaviors. SDM may further reveal patient preferences for delivery of routine diabetes care and education in churches, and other culturally concordant settings, where African Americans may benefit from religious social support and other health-related resources. The American Diabetes Association and American Association of Diabetes Educators recommend a model of shared decision making in the provision of diabetes care and education. While it may take over a decade for uptake of evidence-based recommendations in clinical practice, the Affordable Care Act’s value-based payment strategy may accelerate uptake with modification in practice patterns to facilitate achievement of performance standards. Accelerated uptake of SDM in clinical practice ?with attention to religious orientations and preferences in addition to diabetes prevention and self-management behaviors as warranted ?may help to rebuild trust in the African American community and facilitate more optimal care for this population disproportionately burdened by diabetes.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptAcknowledgmentsFunding: NINR F32 NR010043, NIH NYU CTSA KL2 1ULRRJ Relig Health. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 June 01.Newlin Lew et al.PageBiographyDr. Kelley Newlin Lew is an assistant professor at the University of Connecticut, School of Nursing. Her research focuses on the intersection of diabetes, self-management, and religion and spirituality. She is a past recipient of NIH F31, F32, and KL2 funding. She was awarded the Eastern Nursing Research Society’s Rising Star award in 2010.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript
Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common pregnancy complication, is defined as glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy [1]. Approximately 7 (ranging from 1 to 14 ) of all pregnancies in the United States are complicated by GDM, resulting in more than 200,000 cases annually [1]. Women with GDM have an increased risk for prenatal morbidity and a considerably elevated risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after pregnancy [1]. Furthermore, the offspring of women with GDM are more likely to be obese and have impaired glucose tolerance and T2DM in their early adulthood [2]. Adiposity is an important modifiable risk factor for the development of GDM [3], althoug.

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