A racialized social stratification system that requires successive generations of Caribbean

A racialized social stratification system that requires successive generations of Caribbean Blacks to develop new strategies for adaptation and learning what it means to be Caribbean, Black and American (Vickerman, 1999). As ethnic repositories, religion and worship communities, provide the psychological, social and community space and resources to mold these new identities and insulate Caribbean Black immigrants from prejudice and racism whileRev Relig Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 December 1.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptTaylor et al.Pagesimultaneously assisting their adaptation to a new culture and circumstances (Bashi, 2007). Furthermore, religious identities, behaviors and affiliations are shaped by a broad array of social, generational and contextual factors (e.g., demographic, denominational) that have garnered scant attention in the literature (Cadge Eckland, 2007; Stepick et al., 2009). Finally, questions concerning religious involvement among Caribbean Blacks have strong parallels to research on the historic and contemporary roles of religious institutions in the lives of African Americans (Lincoln Mamiya, 1990; Stepick et al., 2009; Taylor, Chatters Levin, 2004). Religious institutions have functioned in a comparable manner among African Americans in the U.S. (Frazier, 1964; Lincoln Mamiya, 1990). African American churches’ long-standing “civic tradition” of community outreach, social and civic get Luteolin 7-O-��-D-glucoside activism, and political involvement has played a pivotal role in developing independent black institutions (e.g., educational, health, social welfare) and promoting individual and community social resources (Lincoln Mamiya, 1990; Nelsen Nelsen, 1975; Stepick et al., 2009; Taylor et al., 2004). Historically, African American churches assisted in the settlement and community integration of Black migrants from the rural South to urban communities in the Northeast and Midwest and provided critical health and social services functions, helped to establish new arrivals in housing and jobs, and acted as a buffer and mediator of the larger culture (Taylor et al., 2007b; Frazier, 1964). Beclabuvir custom synthesis Further, a growing body of work suggests that African Americans and Caribbean Blacks share similar religious orientations, worship modalities and devotional practices (e.g., call and response, communal prayer, collective/participatory worship) which are a reflection of their common African heritage and worldview (e.g., Maynard-Reid, 2000; Stewart, 1999). Recent comparative analyses (Chatters, Taylor, Bullard Jackson, 2009) indicate that African American and Black Caribbean respondents are largely comparable with respect to various forms of religious participation (e.g., attendance, religious coping, subjective religiosity). The present investigation’s exclusive focus on Caribbean Blacks provides for a more indepth examination of the demographic and denominational correlates of religious involvement within this group.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptFocus of the Present InvestigationThe present investigation seeks to advance the discourse on Black Caribbean religious life by providing a preliminary examination of the demographic and denomination correlates of religious participation among Caribbean Blacks in the United States. Research has demonstrated that religiosity is a multidimensional construct (i.e., conceptualized as having organizational, n.A racialized social stratification system that requires successive generations of Caribbean Blacks to develop new strategies for adaptation and learning what it means to be Caribbean, Black and American (Vickerman, 1999). As ethnic repositories, religion and worship communities, provide the psychological, social and community space and resources to mold these new identities and insulate Caribbean Black immigrants from prejudice and racism whileRev Relig Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 December 1.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptTaylor et al.Pagesimultaneously assisting their adaptation to a new culture and circumstances (Bashi, 2007). Furthermore, religious identities, behaviors and affiliations are shaped by a broad array of social, generational and contextual factors (e.g., demographic, denominational) that have garnered scant attention in the literature (Cadge Eckland, 2007; Stepick et al., 2009). Finally, questions concerning religious involvement among Caribbean Blacks have strong parallels to research on the historic and contemporary roles of religious institutions in the lives of African Americans (Lincoln Mamiya, 1990; Stepick et al., 2009; Taylor, Chatters Levin, 2004). Religious institutions have functioned in a comparable manner among African Americans in the U.S. (Frazier, 1964; Lincoln Mamiya, 1990). African American churches’ long-standing “civic tradition” of community outreach, social and civic activism, and political involvement has played a pivotal role in developing independent black institutions (e.g., educational, health, social welfare) and promoting individual and community social resources (Lincoln Mamiya, 1990; Nelsen Nelsen, 1975; Stepick et al., 2009; Taylor et al., 2004). Historically, African American churches assisted in the settlement and community integration of Black migrants from the rural South to urban communities in the Northeast and Midwest and provided critical health and social services functions, helped to establish new arrivals in housing and jobs, and acted as a buffer and mediator of the larger culture (Taylor et al., 2007b; Frazier, 1964). Further, a growing body of work suggests that African Americans and Caribbean Blacks share similar religious orientations, worship modalities and devotional practices (e.g., call and response, communal prayer, collective/participatory worship) which are a reflection of their common African heritage and worldview (e.g., Maynard-Reid, 2000; Stewart, 1999). Recent comparative analyses (Chatters, Taylor, Bullard Jackson, 2009) indicate that African American and Black Caribbean respondents are largely comparable with respect to various forms of religious participation (e.g., attendance, religious coping, subjective religiosity). The present investigation’s exclusive focus on Caribbean Blacks provides for a more indepth examination of the demographic and denominational correlates of religious involvement within this group.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptFocus of the Present InvestigationThe present investigation seeks to advance the discourse on Black Caribbean religious life by providing a preliminary examination of the demographic and denomination correlates of religious participation among Caribbean Blacks in the United States. Research has demonstrated that religiosity is a multidimensional construct (i.e., conceptualized as having organizational, n.

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