Ion with the cell membrane is a specific and potent means

Ion with the cell membrane is a specific and potent means of inhibiting leucocidin activity (199, 227, 230, 235). Further studies will certainly benefit from a more refined biochemical definition of toxin-receptor interactions. This includes more in-depth investigations into structural features of each toxin that dictate receptor specificity. Importantly, we suggest that receptor recognition motifs within individual toxins are likely to be better therapeutic Sinensetin web targets than the receptors themselves. This is due to the fact that normal signaling through the cellular receptors of the leucocidins is, in most cases, critical for normal immune cell function, including phenomena such as chemotaxis to infected tissue and the induction of optimal inflammatory responses (334). Thus, directed Varlitinib supplier targeting of the leucocidins rather than their receptors is likely to prevent negative outcomes associated with diminishing optimal immune responses that could be brought upon by receptor inhibition. Unfortunately, a major complication in the evaluation of the potential efficacy of any leucocidin-based inhibitor in vivo continues to be the lack of an appropriate animal model. However, the identification of leucocidin receptors suggests considerable potential toward the development of more appropriate smallanimal models to mitigate the complications of species specificity and facilitate therapeutic testing in vivo.CONCLUDING REMARKSOur understanding of leucocidin function has progressed from the identification of a single toxic substance, the “leucocidin,” to the identification of six unique toxic molecules whose biological functions are only now being fully appreciated. It is clear that the study of the leucocidins did not follow a simple path. An initial lack of appreciation for the diversity of leukocidal molecules present within S. aureus confounded many early studies, complicated nomenclature, and often led to phenotypic discrepancies among research groups. Similarly, species specificity associated with cellular targeting significantly slowed the pace of novel discovery as it relates to pathogenesis and infection outcomes. Such complications, along with complex epidemiological associations, have left many puzzling over the true roles of the leucocidins in human disease. In contrast, biochemical and biophysical studies have been met with greater success. Over the course of the past 20 years, a comprehensive model of leucocidin pore formation has been developed, which remains unchallenged today. Although PVL is often considered a mainstay in leucocidin research, it is now becoming clear that other leucocidins are equally capable of exerting potent lytic activity in vitro and in vivo and are certainly deserving of our future research efforts. In the past 5 years, the leucocidins have received a considerable resurgence in attention. Studies have (i) identified and characterized a novel leucocidin (LukAB/HG), (ii) determined that the leucocidins dictate cellular specificity through the recognition of proteinaceous receptors, (iii) applied murine models to investigate leucocidin lytic activity in vivo, (iv) uncovered previously unappreciated proinflammatory functions that occur irrespective of cell lysis, and (v) proposed a number of potential therapeutic methodologies for targeted inhibition of toxin activity. These recent discoveries have opened considerable avenues for future investigation. Some areas of immediate interest include the development of small-anim.Ion with the cell membrane is a specific and potent means of inhibiting leucocidin activity (199, 227, 230, 235). Further studies will certainly benefit from a more refined biochemical definition of toxin-receptor interactions. This includes more in-depth investigations into structural features of each toxin that dictate receptor specificity. Importantly, we suggest that receptor recognition motifs within individual toxins are likely to be better therapeutic targets than the receptors themselves. This is due to the fact that normal signaling through the cellular receptors of the leucocidins is, in most cases, critical for normal immune cell function, including phenomena such as chemotaxis to infected tissue and the induction of optimal inflammatory responses (334). Thus, directed targeting of the leucocidins rather than their receptors is likely to prevent negative outcomes associated with diminishing optimal immune responses that could be brought upon by receptor inhibition. Unfortunately, a major complication in the evaluation of the potential efficacy of any leucocidin-based inhibitor in vivo continues to be the lack of an appropriate animal model. However, the identification of leucocidin receptors suggests considerable potential toward the development of more appropriate smallanimal models to mitigate the complications of species specificity and facilitate therapeutic testing in vivo.CONCLUDING REMARKSOur understanding of leucocidin function has progressed from the identification of a single toxic substance, the “leucocidin,” to the identification of six unique toxic molecules whose biological functions are only now being fully appreciated. It is clear that the study of the leucocidins did not follow a simple path. An initial lack of appreciation for the diversity of leukocidal molecules present within S. aureus confounded many early studies, complicated nomenclature, and often led to phenotypic discrepancies among research groups. Similarly, species specificity associated with cellular targeting significantly slowed the pace of novel discovery as it relates to pathogenesis and infection outcomes. Such complications, along with complex epidemiological associations, have left many puzzling over the true roles of the leucocidins in human disease. In contrast, biochemical and biophysical studies have been met with greater success. Over the course of the past 20 years, a comprehensive model of leucocidin pore formation has been developed, which remains unchallenged today. Although PVL is often considered a mainstay in leucocidin research, it is now becoming clear that other leucocidins are equally capable of exerting potent lytic activity in vitro and in vivo and are certainly deserving of our future research efforts. In the past 5 years, the leucocidins have received a considerable resurgence in attention. Studies have (i) identified and characterized a novel leucocidin (LukAB/HG), (ii) determined that the leucocidins dictate cellular specificity through the recognition of proteinaceous receptors, (iii) applied murine models to investigate leucocidin lytic activity in vivo, (iv) uncovered previously unappreciated proinflammatory functions that occur irrespective of cell lysis, and (v) proposed a number of potential therapeutic methodologies for targeted inhibition of toxin activity. These recent discoveries have opened considerable avenues for future investigation. Some areas of immediate interest include the development of small-anim.

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