Alth care encounter with minimization of patient concerns (Sims, 2010; Peek, Wilson

Alth care encounter with minimization of patient concerns (Sims, 2010; Peek, Wilson, Gorawara-Bhat et al, 2010). Findings also revealed medical distrust may compromise confidence in medical providers with inhibited patient-provider communication, an expressed need for medical vigilance, and/or refusal for medical care. Studies document distrust may foster “hyper-vigilance” and discourage care-seeking, patient-provider communication, and adherence to prescribed regimens of care (Sims, 2010; Benkert, 2005; Jacobs, 2006). Likewise, LY317615 supplier sampling African American’s with diabetes, a qualitative study found distrust of White physicians contributed to reduced treatment adherence and less forthcoming communication (Peek, Wilson, Gorawara-Bhat et al, 2010). In a setting of distrust, participants reported holding firm to their faith for medically-related guidance. For some African Americans, distrust may be managed by a Christian belief system with understanding that God is in control of all things (Abrums 2001; 2004). Self-Management Study results indicated participants often assumed responsibility for their diabetes prevention or self-management behaviors, often with God’s guidance. In terms of medications, some participants self-managed their regimens independent of medical advice while others. self-managed their regimens with the integration of medical guidance, drawing on God’s wisdom. The research literature documents that patients, particularly in the setting of medical distrust, may not follow prescribed medication regimens (Peek, Wilson, Gorawara-Bhat et al, 2010, Lewis, Askie, Randleman, Sheton-Dunston, 2010; Jacobs, 2006; Lukoschek, 2003). In a study sampling African American’s with diabetes, findings revealed participants believed doctors place too much trust in prescription medications (46 ), most prescription medications are addictive (40 ), and prescription medications do more harm than good (25 ) (Piette, Heisler, Harrand, Juip, 2010). Additionally, mounting evidence documents African Americans, particularly those with a strong religious orientation, may call upon God to inspire themselves and/or physicians with guidance for medical decisions, including those concerning medication regimens (Abrums 2001; 2004; Polzer Miles, 2007; Polzer; 2007; Johnson, Elbert-Avila, Tulsky, 2005; Harvey, Cook, Jones, 2010) Findings further indicated the sampled population often assumed responsibility for their diabetes prevention or self-management behaviors in terms of dietary and physical activity patterns. Several participants voiced an eagerness to engage in a BQ-123 biological activity healthy lifestyle whileJ Relig Health. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 June 01.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptNewlin Lew et al.Pageothers reported ongoing efforts to so. However, gaps in dietary knowledge, limited role modeling, and daily commitments to family, church and work served as barriers for some. Likewise, the literature suggests that, among African Americans, dietary knowledge deficits or challenges and uncertainty in applying dietary principles in their daily lives may compromise success with a healthy lifestyle (Murrock, Taylor, Marino, 2013; Boltri, DavisSmith, Zayas 2006). Additional studies underscore adherence to dietary regimens may be inhibited by employment responsibilities and the “multi-caregiver role” with its challenges in caring for others and self (Samuel-Hodge et al 2000; Murrock, Taylor, Marino, 2013). Study findings.Alth care encounter with minimization of patient concerns (Sims, 2010; Peek, Wilson, Gorawara-Bhat et al, 2010). Findings also revealed medical distrust may compromise confidence in medical providers with inhibited patient-provider communication, an expressed need for medical vigilance, and/or refusal for medical care. Studies document distrust may foster “hyper-vigilance” and discourage care-seeking, patient-provider communication, and adherence to prescribed regimens of care (Sims, 2010; Benkert, 2005; Jacobs, 2006). Likewise, sampling African American’s with diabetes, a qualitative study found distrust of White physicians contributed to reduced treatment adherence and less forthcoming communication (Peek, Wilson, Gorawara-Bhat et al, 2010). In a setting of distrust, participants reported holding firm to their faith for medically-related guidance. For some African Americans, distrust may be managed by a Christian belief system with understanding that God is in control of all things (Abrums 2001; 2004). Self-Management Study results indicated participants often assumed responsibility for their diabetes prevention or self-management behaviors, often with God’s guidance. In terms of medications, some participants self-managed their regimens independent of medical advice while others. self-managed their regimens with the integration of medical guidance, drawing on God’s wisdom. The research literature documents that patients, particularly in the setting of medical distrust, may not follow prescribed medication regimens (Peek, Wilson, Gorawara-Bhat et al, 2010, Lewis, Askie, Randleman, Sheton-Dunston, 2010; Jacobs, 2006; Lukoschek, 2003). In a study sampling African American’s with diabetes, findings revealed participants believed doctors place too much trust in prescription medications (46 ), most prescription medications are addictive (40 ), and prescription medications do more harm than good (25 ) (Piette, Heisler, Harrand, Juip, 2010). Additionally, mounting evidence documents African Americans, particularly those with a strong religious orientation, may call upon God to inspire themselves and/or physicians with guidance for medical decisions, including those concerning medication regimens (Abrums 2001; 2004; Polzer Miles, 2007; Polzer; 2007; Johnson, Elbert-Avila, Tulsky, 2005; Harvey, Cook, Jones, 2010) Findings further indicated the sampled population often assumed responsibility for their diabetes prevention or self-management behaviors in terms of dietary and physical activity patterns. Several participants voiced an eagerness to engage in a healthy lifestyle whileJ Relig Health. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 June 01.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptNewlin Lew et al.Pageothers reported ongoing efforts to so. However, gaps in dietary knowledge, limited role modeling, and daily commitments to family, church and work served as barriers for some. Likewise, the literature suggests that, among African Americans, dietary knowledge deficits or challenges and uncertainty in applying dietary principles in their daily lives may compromise success with a healthy lifestyle (Murrock, Taylor, Marino, 2013; Boltri, DavisSmith, Zayas 2006). Additional studies underscore adherence to dietary regimens may be inhibited by employment responsibilities and the “multi-caregiver role” with its challenges in caring for others and self (Samuel-Hodge et al 2000; Murrock, Taylor, Marino, 2013). Study findings.

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